LEGEND OR HYPE: MATT HUGHES

By: R Eric Ellsion 

Here we are again, with our second exciting article on revealing the truth behind MMA’s biggest names. Hoardes of numbers and letters were ruthlessly gathered and forced to create what could only be described as the most hard hitting, realistic approach to passing judgment on our fellow man. In this case, I of course speak of our beloved champions of the cage.

Few of them are loved by all, and many float between being idolized or despized by the fans. We here at FSF tend not to give a schlitts malt liquor about things like that though. Hell, we prefer to get down and dirty with the most widely believed facts. This of course has lead you and I here today within the confines of this rather sexy settling of phrases to find out who lives up to the hype, and who is full of that all too tangable doo-doo.

This week we turn our attention to one of the most dominant champions in UFC history. He isn’t talked about much at all these days, and I’ve always found that a little strange. When MMA fans gather around, not a lot of people mention this former welterweight champion when talking about the greatest fighters ever. Perhaps that’s why we visit him today…to see if the reason for that is simply because he isn’t actually a Legend.

We’re good at that kind of thing. It’s just what we do, and today, it’s Matt Hughes turn.

matt 2

I have come up with a relatively easy set of steps that I take each potential Legend through, awarding them up to five points in each category. The categories are simple: win/loss ratio, average winning streak, caliber of opposition, frequency of fights, and noteworthy accomplishments. So any fighter can earn up to 25 points, with a minimum of about 17 points needed to really be considered seriously as any level of a Legend in MMA.

This method, which is essentially a slimmed down version of my amazingly vast and inappropriate possession of every bit of MMA information out there, should give us a rather honest perspective on the fighters we all love (to hate). Plus, it voids personality/popularity influence, which is an ever growing problem thanks to Dana White’s hobby of star building. Though that may not be so much of an issue this time around…

Win/Loss Record: 45-9 (1998-2011)

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